As women, many of us are prone to neglecting our own dietary needs. You may feel you’re too busy to eat right, used to putting the needs of your family first, or trying to adhere to an extreme diet that leaves you short on vital nutrients and feeling cranky, hungry, and low on energy. Women’s specific needs are often neglected by dietary research, too. Studies tend to rely on male subjects whose hormone levels are more stable and predictable, thus sometimes making the results irrelevant or even misleading to women’s needs. All this can add up to serious shortfalls in your daily nutrition.
Cristy grew up in college station where she lives with her husband and their 5 children. After many years in the work force she has been blessed to be able to be an at home mom for the past 2 years. After the birth of her youngest daughter she became involved in bootcamps and group fitness classes.  It was during this time she discovered her love for fitness and helping people reach their goals. She has since received her Personal Training Certification through AFAAand joined the amazing team at MPower Fitness!  In her spare time, Cristy enjoys spending time with her family and friends.
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Folate or vitamin B9 (also known as folic acid when used in fortified foods or taken as a supplement) is another nutrient that many women don’t get enough of in their diets. Folate can greatly reduce the chance of neurological birth defects when taken before conception and during the first few weeks of pregnancy. Folate can also lower a woman’s risk for heart disease and certain types of cancer, so even if you’re not planning on getting pregnant (and many pregnancies are unplanned), it’s an essential nutrient for every woman of childbearing age. In later life, folate can help your body manufacture estrogen during menopause.
Trimming some fat may eliminate some guilt, but be warned: Buying foods labeled “low-fat,” “non-fat,” or “fat-free” may encourage you to eat up to 50 percent more calories, according to three studies by Cornell University’s Food and Brand Lab. Fat’s not the issue when it comes your weight since most of these foods only have about 15 percent fewer calories than their regular counterparts. Go for the full-fat version and eat less—you probably will naturally since they taste better.
"In December of 2015, I was looking for a new gym home. At that time, I thought I was only looking for two things: one, a place to challenge me physically without blowing my budget each month and two, a safe, loving place I could bring my, then, 14-month-old daughter while I worked out. Within a week of being there, bringing my daughter, and participating in a wide variety of different classes (that I loved, by the way), I had found those two thing but realized something else I had been missing, something MPower had shown me in such a short time: this was the place that would feed my soul. The people there feed my soul. We sweat together. We struggle together. We do life together. We work on nutrition together. We build muscles together. The relationships I have made shoulder to shoulder, kettlebells in hand, sweat pouring from our faces, I’ve met some of the most incredible people. There are no strangers at MPower Fitness. Their building that houses bumper plates, rowers, medicine balls, spin bikes – this place that calls us back every day to endure physical challenges together: it’s home. And, in their childcare room, the room my toddler daughter runs to while not interested in telling me goodbye, is run by sweet, loving caretakers who keep a clean house. The owner, Ashley, Andrew, Allison, Dallas, Brooke, and the rest of MPower’s incredible staff are not only experts in their field who challenge us day in and day out, they have passion for what they do. Their passion beyond fitness is the people. It’s us. And, it’s about helping us be a better version of ourselves. They can see it and they help us see it. That is what greets you at the doors, walking in to MPower Fitness for the first time. It is them and their people that make me feel like I’m home. Almost six months later, I am leaner and stronger than I’ve ever been, but more than that – I am the happiest I’ve ever been, and I attribute much of that to the gift MPower has given me."
Yahweh Yoga is a 55 minute class, including 15 minutes of an encouraging Bible meditation and 45 minutes of vinyasa yoga. Come and prepare your mind, body and soul for the week ahead, or end it on a positive and calming note where you are empowered by the Word of God. Set to praise and worship music this class provides an excellent opportunity to calm yourself, break a sweat, and worship.

Amber received her B.S. in Sports Management from Texas A&M University in 2010. In college she was 4-year lettermen, and captain of the Texas A&M Women’s Soccer Team. Amber is currently the Membership Director at Pebble Creek Country Club. She is passionate about building relationships and helping others achieve their physical, personal, and spiritual goals. She volunteers with FCA, where she mentors young girls to build their relationship with Christ. Amber also enjoys photography in her spare time. Amber is mom to one furbaby, Mia (West Highland Terrier) and married to former Texas A&M Baseball pitcher, Kirkland Rivers ‘08.
Most experts recommend 1,300 mg of calcium a day for girls aged 9 through 19. Natural sources of calcium, such as low-fat dairy products, are the smartest choice, because they also contain vitamin D and protein, both required for calcium absorption. Milk, yogurt, and cheese contribute most of the calcium in our diets. Some vegetables are also good sources, including broccoli, kale, and Chinese cabbage. Many foods are supplemented with calcium, including some brands of orange juice and tofu. The daily intake for Vitamin D is 600 IU per day for most children and healthy adults.
Sugar is a source of calories, not nutrients. Consuming too much sugar can lead to weight gain and tooth decay. Contrary to what many people think, there is no evidence linking high-sugar diets to hyperactivity or diabetes. However, high-fructose corn syrup, found in most processed foods, is linked with obesity, and obesity increases your risk for developing diabetes and other conditions.
To help you learn how to eat healthfully, start with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) dietary guidelines system, which you can find at http://www.mypyramid.gov. The MyPyramid system, which looks somewhat like the familiar food pyramid of old, offers guidance based on individual needs and replaces "serving" recommendations with actual amounts of food. It also emphasizes the importance of balancing nutritious (and tasty!) food choices from all food groups every day with daily physical activity.
Dairy. Women should get 3 cups of dairy each day, but most women get only half that amount.6 If you can’t drink milk, try to eat low-fat plain yogurt or low-fat cheese. Dairy products are among the best food sources of the mineral calcium, but some vegetables such as kale and broccoli also have calcium, as do some fortified foods such as fortified soymilk, fortified cereals, and many fruit juices. Most girls ages 9 to 18 and women older than 50 need more calcium for good bone health.
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