While what works best for one woman may not always be the best choice for another, the important thing is to build your dietary choices around your vital nutritional needs. Whether you’re looking to improve your energy and mood, combat stress or PMS, boost fertility, enjoy a healthy pregnancy, or ease the symptoms of menopause, these nutrition tips can help you to stay healthy and vibrant throughout your ever-changing life.
Hey Everyone! My name is Courtney Roberts and my husband and I recently moved to College Station. My husband works for Cellucor and is a proud Texas A&M Aggie Alum. I, on the other hand, am a LSU graduate, so the SEC rivalry is alive and well at our house! Before moving to College Station, I was a 2nd grade teacher for 7 years in The Woodlands. I got into biking and cycling about 9 years ago when my Mom was diagnosed with MS. My family became very involved in participating in the BP MS150 and bringing awareness to the illness. When Ashley gave me the opportunity to teach cycling classes, I jumped on the chance! When I am not cycling, I enjoy cooking, watching football, and hanging out with my dogs Beaux and Baleigh.
Low-fat dairy products are excellent sources of calcium. Other good sources of calcium include salmon, tofu (soybean curd), certain vegetables (broccoli), legumes (peas and beans), calcium-enriched grain products, lime-processed tortillas, seeds and nuts. If you do not regularly consume adequate food sources of calcium, a calcium supplement can be considered to reach the recommended amount. The current recommendations for women for calcium are for a minimum of 1,200 mg per day.

MPOWER Fitness was started with the goal of encouraging, inspiring and motivating people in a way that equips them to do anything they set their minds to do.  We started as a small group of 15 in an extra room at a friend’s house on May 1st, 2015.  We quickly outgrew that space and had to move our training to a local park.  I soon realized that there were more and more people that needed this idea of teaching movement within exercise that transferred over into our daily movement in life.  I knew immediately who would be able to help me with this goal.  Looking to move back to the BCS area, I called my now head trainer, Andrew Ramirez, and asked him to join me on this very risky, yet exciting journey.  Andrew agreed, and with the help of some close friends, MPOWER Fitness was born.  In just 6 short months, we went from exercising in parks to opening our doors November 1, 2015.  With some incredible employees, friends and family by my side, we have created an environment where people not only feel safe but are being taught how to "move" properly.  The instruction taught inside MPOWER Fitness is based upon exaggerated movements that mimic everyday life.  We believe that simple equipment yields simple movement and our philosophy is such that a strong mind is the prerequisite for a strong body.


Women have many unique health concerns — menstrual cycles, pregnancy, birth control, menopause — and that's just the beginning. A number of health issues affect only women and others are more common in women. What's more, men and women may have the same condition, but different symptoms. Many diseases affect women differently and may even require distinct treatment.
I subscribed to this magazine thinking it would be about health, fitness, and above all, working out. The headlines on the cover seemed to suggest that was true, with the biggest fonts advertising things like "flat abs now" and "maximize your workout". In reality, the content of the magazine is mostly beauty (how that counts as "health" is beyond me) and weight-loss. Oh, the endless, endless articles about "burn more fat!" "three new foods that will help you burn fat!" "drop pounds with this easy exercise!" I don't need to lose weight and I found that these articles just played into my growing impression, as issue after issue dropped on my doormat, that the magazine views women as vapid, stereotypical beings whose only desire is to look good, whether through exercise (almost inevitably restricted to cardio and yoga), the "right" work-out clothes (really?) or knowing what dress is in fashion or what color make-up to buy. If you enjoy that sort of thing, that's fine- it is essentially one step above Cosmopolitan on the seriousness scale. If you're looking for actual information about working out and building muscle, know that Women's Health magazine is barely aware that these things exist, and when it does, it will come wrapped in the form of "ten minutes a day to tone your bum like a super-model!" or something equally cringe-inducing.
A year later, a second Harvard study added to the concern. The Physicians' Health Study of 20,885 men did not evaluate diet per se, but it did measure the blood levels of ALA in 120 men who developed prostate cancer and compared them with the levels in 120 men who remained free of the disease. Men with moderately high ALA blood levels were 3.4 times more likely to develop prostate cancer than men with the lowest levels; curiously, though, men with the very highest levels were only 2 times more likely to get the disease.
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