Mexican researchers were finally able to isolate the unique way that it works: The plant is an inhibitor of alpha-glucosidase, an enzyme that releases sugar from foods, particularly carbohydrates. We all know that carbohydrates, especially simple carbs like sugar and foods made with white flour, are the bugaboo of people with Type 2 diabetes, so this news alone is a huge boon for people with the disease.
Stay Hydrated. Drinking water throughout the day is always good to keep your organs and skin healthy. Of course, getting some fluid before, during and after exercise is just as important to avoid becoming dehydrated. However, what you choose matters a lot. For example, skip the soda. New findings come out regularly to warn against the negative health effects of added sugar, including fructose (ie, high fructose corn syrup), honey, and agave.
Control portions and eat smaller meals. Consuming generous portions and large meals requires your pancreas to work harder to secrete the needed insulin to bring your blood sugar down. The extra calories consumed due to sizeable portions and large meals also makes it harder for you to lose weight which is usually necessary for better blood sugar control.

The average American eats 2 servings of produce a day and french fries and ketchup count! These colorful earthly delights provide us with so much nutrition that we would be fools not to figure out a way to enjoy them. Start with just increasing by 1 serving a week and before you know it you will have reached the recommended 9-11 servings a day. The quickest way to get a jump on more vegetables is to fill half your lunch a dinner plate with a cooked or raw vegetable. My favorite is pre-cut, washed and shredded raw cabbage salad with carrots, cherry tomatoes, avocado and little dressing.


Those with diabetes should be results oriented. Find the scientist in yourself and track your numbers and push them to your goal ranges: pounds, blood glucose levels, A1c, minutes of moderate exercise every week, etc. Choose what is important to you, and identify concrete strategies to improve your numbers. A dietitian, especially one who is a diabetes educator can assist you to start slow, set goals, and identify sequential steps to reach each goal gradually. They can act as a coach to help you celebrate successes. and move on to another goal or challenge. Along with the other members of your health care them, let them be your cheerleader!
Cut back on added sugar. Read nutrition facts and ingredient lists to help with this. If sugar is one of the first 3 ingredients- the product may have too much sugar. Use fresh or frozen (without added sugar) fruit to flavor or sweetened things instead of buying things already flavored with less healthy sugars or flavorings. For example: instead of buying strawberry yogurt. Buy plain yogurt and add fresh berries. You will not only be cutting back on added sugars, but you will be adding fiber and volume which can help fill you up and control your blood sugar.
The desert’s scorching heat and torrential rainfalls stress the Hintonia latiflora tree and provide the keys to a powerful defense mechanism inherent in the plant and an essential part of its medicinal value. The natural environmental stresses to the tree enhance its ability to survive and thrive in such a harsh environment and are key to hintonia’s traditional use to treat Type 2 diabetes and gastrointestinal problems.

A common recommendation for preventing diabetes is “eat healthy and lose weight.” But that advice is extremely broad. What does that even mean? One person’s interpretation of how to eat healthy could be entirely different from the next. And some tactics people might try in order to lose weight can be counterproductive and increase the risk of diabetes instead.
Extra pounds are among the most significant modifiable risk factors for prediabetes and diabetes, and the prediabetes diet plan that you choose should help you achieve and maintain a healthy weight. While a “healthy” BMI is considered to be under 25 kg/m2 (that is 155 lb. for a 5’6” woman and 179 lb. for a 5’11” man), it may not be necessary to get under that weight to lower your risk. Losing as little as 5% of your body weight – or 8 to 10 lb. if you weigh 160 to 200 lb. – can decrease diabetes risk.
Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis.
The process of type 2 diabetes begins years or even decades before the diagnosis of diabetes, with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the beginning of the body not dealing well with sugar, which is the breakdown product of all carbohydrates. Insulin tells certain body cells to open up and store glucose as fat. When the cells stop responding your blood sugar rises, which triggers the release of more insulin in a vicious cycle. Insulin resistance is associated with abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, and low HDL ("good cholesterol"). When these occur together, it is known as metabolic syndrome or pre-diabetes. It is a risk factor for heart disease and type 2 diabetes.
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